Fifth Anguish

Fifth Anguish

Antonio de Amusco, 1602

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HOLY THRUSDAY
Fifth Anguish

Description

Made by Antonio de Amusco in 1607, his devotion is documented in the city of Palencia from the late sixteenth century. This sculpture comes to copy the model created by Juan de Juni in the Virgin of Anguish from Valladolid, which from dates close to his execution was also known as "Virgen of Knives", so he carried on her chest until the restoration and elimination of them in 1971. The image of Palencia is clearly inspired by the work of Juan de Juni, although its disposition is inverted with respect to the original. There is a possibility that Antonio de Amusco might be inspired by the engraving of Juan de Roelas, active in Valladolid between 1598 and 1602, made on dates close to the execution of the Virgin from Palencia. In this engraving the Valladolid image is already represented with the knives on the chest. In the last restoration undertaken to the image of Palencia throughout 2006, just as happened with the image of Juni, the knives on his chest have been suppressed. These elements were surely original of the size, which would be projected from their creation with them arranged on his chest. In addition, this idea is reflected in the fact that in 1604, when the Rule of the Brotherhood of Jesus Nazarene from Palencia was written, it is said in Chapter 28, that the passage of the Virgin that closes the procession of this penitential, is an image of the Angustias with seven swords, that probably followed the model of the Fifth Anguish.